SinuSonic

Science

Science-backed Clinically Supported Nasal Relief

What makes SinuSonic unique is that it is not a drug. It’s not a spray. It’s not an irrigation device.

Most of the current treatments for nasal congestion and rhinitis are drugs that must be ingested into the body on a regular basis. These include various nasal sprays (decongestants or steroids), pills (decongestants and antihistamines)or uncomfortable nasal irrigators, each of which has its own side effects and risks. SinuSonic delivers acoustic vibration and gentle pressure, harnessing the body’s own mechanisms in order to open nasal passages naturally.

SinuSonics design is based on our extensive research of the therapeutic effects of positive expiratory pressure (PEP) and vibration on airway functionality and mucous movement in chronic lung conditions. Although the SinuSonic device combines PEP and vibration differently than existing devices, we’re confident that it will aid in upper airway functionality and mucous movement, similar to the proven therapeutic effects for lower airway congestion.

Our confidence is based on a 2008 systematic review by Hristara-Papadopoulou and colleagues found that most of the existing devices that combine PEP and vibration lead to a statistically significant increase in lung volumes, ciliary motility, and sputum production for those with cystic fibrosis. Our most recent clinical trial also supports the success of SinuSonic.

Further rationale for incorporating acoustic vibration is based on research suggesting that human humming improves sinonasal patency via increases in nitric oxide, a natural smooth muscle relaxant created biologically, that has anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial/fungal/viral properties.

Nasal Congestion's Impact

Nasal congestion, the uncomfortable sensation of nasal fullness, restriction, and/or draining, is a common phenomenon that plagues all of us at one time or another.
Chronic or recurring nasal congestion, which affects between 10-20% of the global population, is a particularly troublesome experience associated with reduced quality of life, difficulty sleeping, reduced daytime performance, and increased healthcare utilization.1
It has been estimated that the financial impact of chronic nasal congestion is more than US $5-10 billion annually.2,3

Limitations of Current Options

The four pairs of air-filled paranasal sinuses have an anatomically unfavorable position in that they lie in proximity to the nasal cavity which is heavily colonized by bacteria, viruses, mold, and other environmental pathogens.4

Inflammation of the nasal mucosa can cause obstruction of the ostia, the small openings that connect the sinuses and nasal cavity, causing poor sinus ventilation, inadequate drainage, discomfort, and even infection.5

A myriad of products exist to manage the symptoms of nasal congestion including pain relievers and anti-inflammatories, decongestants, antihistamines, and nasal irrigation. However, these treatments are limited in that they provide only partial and/or temporary relief and sometimes have untoward side-effects.

For example, it is well-established that use of nasal spray decongestants, such as oxymetazoline, can lead to a phenomenon known as rebound congestion or nasal spray dependence6.

Additionally, systemic decongestant agents, such as pseudoephedrine, have been shown to increase blood pressure and are associated with dependency (DEA Title VII of Public Law 109-177).7

Given the limitations of current treatment options for nasal congestion, there is need for novel non-pharmacologic therapies, ideally ones that target the unique anatomy of the sinus system.

SinuSonic's Approach

The SinuSonic is a novel self-applied nasal device designed to reduce nasal congestion via simultaneous administration of acoustic vibration and gentle oscillating expiratory pressure. The SinuSonic consists of a fully disposable medical grade silicone nosepiece mounted to a resin body. The device is equipped with a flutter valve located at the top of the device which creates gentle, self-guided oscillating expiratory resistance. Acoustic vibration is emitted via a single circuit board speaker at the base of the device at approximately 128Hz8.

The fundamental underpinnings of the device’s design are based on research substantiating the therapeutic effects of positive expiratory pressure (PEP) and vibration on airway patency and mucous movement in chronic lung conditions. Although the SinuSonic device combines PEP and vibration differently than devices used for lung conditions (i.e. by adding acoustic and mechanical vibration to PEP), it is hypothesized that utilization of the aforementioned techniques will aid in upper airway patency and mucous movement, similar to the proven therapeutic effects for lower airway congestion. For example, a 2008 systematic review by Hristara-Papadopoulou and colleagues found that most of the devices that combine PEP and vibration produce statistically significant increase in lung volumes, ciliary motility, and sputum production for those with cystic fibrosis.9 The rationale for incorporating acoustic vibration is based on research suggesting that human humming improves sinonasal patency via increases in nitric oxide,4,10-12 a smooth muscle relaxant that has anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial/fungal/viral properties.13

Big clinical trial with two important goals

Our latest clinical trial was conducted with two simple goals in mind, guaranteeing the safety and effectiveness of our SinuSonic device. Based on how the device works, we really had very little concerns regarding safety. However, it’s important to make sure the device truly is safe in the real world. Therefore, we asked patients about pain/discomfort, bleeding, and crusting. We also performed rhinoscopy, which means we visually looked into people’s noses to make sure the mucosal lining all looked normal after use.

Next, we sought to prove SinuSonic was an effective solution to nasal discomfort. We measured PNIF, which stands for “Peak Nasal Inspiratory Flow.” Basically, PNIF is a measure of how much air somebody can breathe in through their nose. People who are stuffy or congested tend to have lower PNIF scores. People with really open noses will have higher PNIF scores. Although PNIF is a great measure of nasal airflow, we didn’t want to stop there.

We also wanted to ensure that SinuSonic could actually improve our patients’ overall quality of life. To do this, we used a variety of measurements to calculate each patients quality of life. We compared quality of life scores before and after SinuSonic use to determine if there was any change.

What did we find?

We found that PNIF scores increased by 15% after just three minutes and 30% after two weeks of twice-daily treatments.

This is a pretty dramatic increase in airflow that was statistically and clinically significant. Basically, this was similar to what you might experience by using a decongestant spray, but without all of the problems that these sprays cause with chronic use. In fact, this improvement was not that different from what some patients experience with surgical procedures to improve airflow.

We also found dramatic and significant improvements in nasal congestion, facial pressure, and nasal drainage. Results also pointed to dramatic and significant improvements in quality of life using two different surveys, the NOSE score and the SNOT-22 score.

Why are these findings important?

What this means is that not only does airflow improve after using SinuSonic, but patients also actually feel significantly better, and most importantly their quality of life is significantly better.

To the average person without nasal or sinus problems, it might seem weird that a device that improves nasal congestion could actually improve someone’s quality of life. However, chronic nasal or sinus congestion can really interfere with someone’s quality of life and their ability to function; so we now that a treatment that can reduce these symptoms can have a huge positive impact.

NOSE score results

NOSE stands for the “Nasal Obstruction and Septoplasty Effectiveness” scale. The NOSE score is calculated using a validated questionnaire that consists of five questions related to a patient’s nasal congestion over the last month. Each question is scored from 0-4. The total score is multiplied by 5 and can range from 0-100, with 0 being the best and 100 being the worst. The NOSE scale is usually used to determine how much improvement a patient experiences after undergoing surgical procedures to treat nasal congestion. This instrument really captures how badly nasal congestion impacts a patient. In this study, NOSE scores improved significantly after using the SinuSonic device. In fact, the NOSE score improved by 27.1 points after five weeks, which was statistically and clinically significant.

SNOT-22 Score Results

SNOT-22 stands for the “22-item Sinonasal Outcome Test.” Essentially, this is a set of 22 questions that ask patients about various symptoms such as nasal congestion, facial pressure, nasal drainage, etc. and how these impact their quality of life.

Each question is scored from 0-5 and combined for a total score from 0-110. The higher the score, the lower their quality of life. The SNOT-22 score is currently the most widely utilized quality of life instrument for studying outcomes for patients with chronic sinusitis. In this study, the SNOT-22 score improved an average of 17.5 points after five weeks, which was statistically and clinically significant.

VAS Score Results

VAS stands for “Visual Analog Scale.” Most people are familiar with these types of scales, which ask patients to rate their symptoms ranging from 0-10, with 10 being the worst and 0 the best. In this study, patients started with a baseline average of 5.8. After using SinuSonic for five weeks, these scores decreased to 2.6, which was statistically and clinically significant.

PNIF Results

PNIF stands for “Peak Nasal Inspiratory Flow.” PNIF is a measure of how much air somebody can breathe in through their nose. This is recorded in liters per minute (L/min). People who are stuffy or congested tend to have lower PNIF scores. Those whose nose is more open will have higher scores. After three minutes of SinuSonic use, PNIF scores increased from 79.5 L/min to 91.3 L/min. After two weeks of twice-daily usage, PNIF scores increased all the way to 104.5 L/min.

Why should this matter to you?

As you are aware, patients can find themselves on many different medications these days. Don’t get me wrong, medications are incredibly important. But they can also have notable costs, side effects, and interactions. This is particularly important for a chronic condition, where a patient might have to use the medication for years at a time. A lot of people are looking for ways to reduce the number of medications they take. They are paying more and more attention to what they are putting into their bodies. Whether you’re interested in reducing the medications you take, avoiding costly surgeries, or saving money, SinuSonic is your solution.


1 Stewart M, Ferguson B, Fromer L. Epidemiology and burden of nasal congestion. International Journal of General Medicine. 2010; 3:37-45.
2 Meltzer EO, Bukstein DA. The economic impact of allergic rhinitis and current guidelines for treatment. Annals of Allergy Asthma Immunology. 2011; 106(2 Suppl):S12-6
3 DeConde AS, Soler ZM. Chronic rhinosinusitis: Epidemiology and burden of disease. American Journal of Rhinology and Allergy. 2016; 30(2):134-9
4 Lundberg JO. Nitric oxide and the paranasal sinuses. The Anatomical Record (Hoboken). 2008; 291(11):1479-84
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